MINI ALMANAC


Calendar

Moon phase


Highlights:

Norbert Wiener

IG-NOBEL 2005

The Da Vinci Code

Holy Blood, Holy Grail

The Solomon Key

NOBEL MEDICINE 2004

IG-NOBEL PRIZES
2004

The first email

Concerned Scientists write to Bush

Economics Nobel 2003

Chemistry Nobel 2003

Medicine Nobel 2003
Literature Nobel 2003

Physics Nobel 2003

Life on Mars ?
Rosalind Franklin and the Discovery of Double Helix

Good Bye Dolly
On Stonehenge
The Loss of Columbia
IG Nobel 2002
The invention of :-)
West Nile Virus
Asteroid Impact?
Molecule Hunt
Tuxedo Park
Ancient Trade Routes
Pop Singer to Fly In Space
Great Ideas

Computational Genomics

Bioinformatics


Baraka

The Universe in a Nutshell
Copenhagen, the Play
Count of Monte Cristo
Nobel Prize 2001
John Nash
Echelon
Kernel Methods

Ig-Nobel Prize
Einstein's Brain
Space Turism
Floating City
Mir's Blast
Origins
Great Books
Nobel Prize
In the mind of:
Serial Killers
The secret shuttle
Are we aliens?
Studying ET
Dinosaurs
Bonobo
Pattern Analysis
Early Vibrators
and Hysteria
The CYB.ORGs
among us
Book: Darwin
Book: Russell

 

The first @

The exact origin of email is not easy to establish, but certainly we can pinpoint the origin of modern email addresses: in October 1971, an engineer named Ray Tomlinson chose the '@' symbol for email addresses and wrote software to send the first network email.

[read his story here]

The " little snail" @ has since become a staple of online communication.

Mr Tomlinson has been called the father of e-mail because, back in 1971, he invented the software that allowed messages to be sent between computers. He didn't invent e-mail itself. That had been around since 1965 when Fernando Corbato and colleagues at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology developed a program to let the individual users of the institution's Compatible Timesharing System (CTSS) swap messages.

But that program only let people using one machine communicate with each other. Ray Tomlinson made it possible to swap messages between machines in different locations; between universities, across continents, and oceans.

At the time Mr Tomlinson was working for Boston-based Bolt, Beranek and Newman, (BBN )which was helping to develop Arpanet, the forerunner of the modern internet.

Just as important as the 200 lines of code that made up the e-mail software was Mr Tomlinson's elegant way of organising the addresses of people and the computers that held their e-mail account.

The Model 33 Teletype keyboard connected to the computer Mr Tomlinson was using only had about 12 punctuation characters. Out of this limited pool he plumped for the @ symbol which has since become an icon for the internet age - as well as launching a thousand naff company names.


 

Weaving the Web: The Original Design and Ulitmate Desitiny of the World Wide Web
by Tim Berners-Lee, et al

Amazon.com
If you can read this review (and voice your opinion about Tim Berners-Lee's book Weaving the Web on Amazon.com), you have the author to thank. When you've read his no-nonsense account of how he invented the World Wide Web,... Read more



Where Wizards Stay Up Late
by Katie Hafner, Matthew Lyon

Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace
by Lawrence Lessig

 

 

Va Pensiero - Copyright 2004- In association with Amazon.com

 

SEE ALSO
ALAN TURING:
THE ENIGMA

TIM BERNERS-LEE:
THE WEB-WEAVER

First :-)

Quotable Quote

Random Link

History of Technology

Is this Monument Telling the Truth ?



This monument in downtown Boston is at odds with a recent Congress resolution, granting to Antonio Meucci - not Alexander Bell - moral rights for the invention of the telephone .... more

Quick Fact

The expression World Wide Web (WWW) was created by Berners Lee in 1989.


Improbable Research

The 2005 IG Nobel Prizes were awarded in a ceremony at Harvard University.

THE 2005 AWARDS:

CLICK HERE !

 

... read more